How the Racism in Our Community Comes Back to Hurt Us

“And now we’re going to count the way cleaning ladies count! Uno, dos…”

My kindergarten age daughter learned to count in Spanish and this was how morah introduced the skill at graduation. Many of the mothers laughed. The subtle insinuation that all people who speak Spanish, or at least all the people from Mexico, are here only to be our cleaning ladies, went straight over everyone’s heads and into the hearts of our five-year-olds.

How many little things do we say or do that reflect the attitude that someone—or a group of someones—is worth less because of their color, nationality, or financial status?

 How often do we judge people as inferior, not by their actions or personality, but by the circumstance of their birth?

 

Telling a child not to play with another child on the playground simply because www.ourhealthissues.com/product/lisinopril/ he’s from a different background introduces the idea that different equals inferior. And when that child is another Jewish child, but maybe a different looking Jewish child, that sentiment has already been ingrained and carries over to bias within the community as well.

 

It’s not surprising when a yeshivish child makes fun of “chassidishas” because the chassidish child looks different than he does and therefore must be inferior. Or a child with darker skin. Or a child with a foreign accent. Or one with a disability. Our children are being taught that different is lesser and that message stays with them for life. Only by examining our own motives behind the things we say and do, can we break the cycle of elitism and prejudice that should be an embarrassment to a community so often subjected to to prejudice itself.  What do you think?

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Esti Waldman
Esti is the camera behind the beautiful editorial pages of popular magazines and today’s most successful commercial ad campaigns for food and fashion brands. She’s also a popular family photographer and is a super creative mom with a knack for pulling together adorable outfits and amazing parties. Follow her on Instagram @estiphotography

1 COMMENT

  1. I know this is quite late, but I came across between carpools only recently and have been slowly scrolling through old posts. I absolutely love this post. I used to get terribly frustrated by high-school classmates who said things like “I want to take Spanish so I can talk to my cleaning help.” And yes, it is ridiculous that such a persecuted people doesn’t seem to be able to refrain from prejudice toward others.

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